How to Make an Angle Fan

How to Make an Angle Fan

Angle Fans – Measuring Angles Made Fun!

Angles is a fun Maths topic to teach – but let me show you a way to take those measuring angles lessons to the next lesson!

I first discovered Angle Fans when I was teaching Year 5. They have since become an activity that I include every year in my upper primary Maths classes to expore angle properties and to practise measuring angles informally. I am excited to share the idea with you so that you and your students can hopefully join in on the fun with me!

Curriculum links

But before I explain to you how to make them, let me explain what outcomes this little activity can be ticking off (or at the very least contributing to the learning of!):
Year 6 Maths
Identify the relationships between angles on a straight line, angles at a point and vertically opposite angles; use these to determine unknown angles, communicating reasoning (AC9M6M04)
Year 5 Maths
Estimate, construct and measure angles in degrees, using appropriate tools including a protractor, and relate these measures to angle names (AC9M5M04)
Year 4 Maths
estimate and compare angles using angle names including acute, obtuse, straight angle, reflex and revolution, and recognise their relationship to a right angle (AC9M4M04)

I probably wouldn’t try this activity with kiddos any younger than year 4. It is a little fiddly and may become a class management nightmare if you want them to complete it independently!

The Process

Step 1 Decorate and then cut out two squares of paper or choose two coloured squares of paper already to cut to size. *Decorate both sides so you see the decorations after folding.

Step 2 Concertina fold each square by folding over and under, over and under until you have two springs.

angle fan folding | ridgy didge resources | australia

Step 3 Fold your springs in half so the open ends meet and glue the halves together. Let them dry for a few minutes.

angle fan unfold | ridgy didge resources | australia

Step 4 Now you are going to glue each of the squares together to create a larger fan. Let them dry for a few minutes.

angle fan gluing | ridgy didge resources | australia

Step 5 Get two popsticks and have an adult help you to cut one curved end off. Put some glue on a popstick and stick it in the first fold of one side of your fan.

angle fan closed | ridgy didge resources | australia

Step 6 Do the same with the other popstick to the other side of the fan.

angle fan quarter open | ridgy didge resources | australia

Step 7 Now you can pull out the fan by the popsticks to make some angles! Pull it gently right around to form a circle!

angle fan full open | ridgy didge resources | australia

So what do you reckon? Will you try this activity next time you are teaching angles to your upper primary students?

For more fun activities like this one, check out our Year 6 Angles Properties Maths unit:

Australian Curriculum Year 6 Maths Unit Angles | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Or our Year 5 Measuring Angles Maths Unit:

Australian Curriculum Year 5 Maths Unit Angles | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

I hope you found this helpful!

Angle Fan Craft | Ridgy didge resources | Australia

 

Measuring Angles – Geometric Animal Art

Measuring Angles – Geometric Animal Art

Measuring Angles Art Idea

I love integrating art and maths! It is an awesome way to bring a difficult or more boring Maths topic to life.

When you are teaching your students how to measure angles to your upper primary students, art is the most fun way to get your kiddos excited about the topic.

Today I thought I would share with you one of my most favourite Maths + Art ideas!! The result is truly amazing and it ticks HEAPS of teaching and learning goals at the same time.

Curriculum links

But before I share with you what the activity is, let me explain what outcomes this unit can be ticking off (or at the very least contributing to the learning of!):
Year 6 Maths
Identify the relationships between angles on a straight line, angles at a point and vertically opposite angles; use these to determine unknown angles, communicating reasoning (AC9M6M04)
Year 6 Visual Arts 
Use visual conventions, visual arts processes and materials to plan and create artworks that communicate ideas, perspectives and/or meaning (AC9AVA6C01).
Select and present documentation of visual arts practice, and display artworks in informal and/or formal settings (AC9AVA6O01).
Year 5 Maths
Estimate, construct and measure angles in degrees, using appropriate tools including a protractor, and relate these measures to angle names (AC9M5M04)
Year 5 Visual Arts 
Use visual conventions, visual arts processes and materials to plan and create artworks that communicate ideas, perspectives and/or meaning (AC9AVA6C01).
Select and present documentation of visual arts practice, and display artworks in informal and/or formal settings (AC9AVA6O01).
Year 4 Maths
estimate and compare angles using angle names including acute, obtuse, straight angle, reflex and revolution, and recognise their relationship to a right angle (AC9M4M04)
Year 4 Visual Arts
Experiment with a range of ways to use visual conventions, visual arts processes and materials (AC9AVA4D01).
Use visual conventions, visual arts processes and materials to create artworks that communicate ideas, perspectives and/or meaning (AC9AVA4C01).

I probably wouldn’t try this activity with kiddos any younger than year 4. I’m not sure they would completely be able to visualise and implement the skills required to complete the artwork. The exploration of angles below year 3 is a lot simpler too, so other activities may be of more assistance with their learning at this age level.

The Process

Step 1 Trace a straight-edged outline of your animal onto white paper. Use a window or light box to help you see the image clearly.

angle art animal outline | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Step 2 Place 3-5 dots within your image to become points of interest.

Step 3 Use a ruler and pencil to draw lines from the points of interests to the intersections and the outline of the body to create angles within your image.

angle art animal outline with lines | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Step 4 Go over your pencil lines with a fine liner and erase the pencil markings.

angle art animal outline with black lines | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Step 5 Have your students then colour in each section they have created inside their animal outline. You can also then have the cut out their animal and glue it next to the original image onto a black piece of card.

angle art animal outline with colour | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

angle art animal outline finished product | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Step 6 Have your students try to find all the different types of angles they have learnt about.

What do you reckon? Will you try this activity next time you are teaching angles to your upper primary students?

For more fun activities like this one, check out our Year 6 Angles Properties Maths unit:

Australian Curriculum Year 6 Maths Unit Angles | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Or our Year 5 Measuring Angles Maths Unit:

Australian Curriculum Year 5 Maths Unit Angles | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

I hope you found this helpful!

Measuring Angles Art Idea | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

 

Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum: Year 4

Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum: Year 4

Every teacher can testify to the engagement received by their students when offered to be read a story. Whether it be from a picture book or novel, stories bring so much enjoyment to children’s lives. The added bonus is that they can also be great tools for linking various content areas of the Australian Curriculum.

I have gathered a list of books that I highly recommend for Year 4 Teachers to use as they are teaching to the Australian Curriculum throughout the year. I have sorted these books into curriculum content areas but you will quickly notice that most of the books link to other content areas making them great tools for the time-poor Australian Teacher. (please note the following list contains affiliate links)

English

Language
Dear Deer: A Book of Homophones
I Am Different!: Can You Find Me?
Runny Babbit: A Billy Sook
A Report (Pick a Picture, Write)

Literacy
Famous Five: Five On A Treasure Island: Book 1 (Famous Five)
Adventure Island: The Mystery of the Whistling Caves: Book 1 (Adventure Island)

Literature
Animal Crackers Fly the Coop
Frindle
There’s a Boy in the Girls’ Bathroom

Maths

Measurement and Geometry
Ernest: 10th Anniversary Edition
Pigs on a Blanket: Fun with Math and Time (Reading rainbow book)

Number and Algebra
30 Million Different Insects in the Rainforest
Ten Thousand, Eight Hundred and Twenty Endangered Species in the Animal Kingdom (Big Countdown)
How Big is a Million? (Picture Poster Books)
Anno’s Magic Seeds

Statistics and Probability
Do You Wanna Bet?: Your Chance to Find Out about Probability

Science

Biological Sciences
Cat on the Island
Finding Home
Gorilla (Life Cycles)
Leaf Litter
One Small Island
Owl (Life Cycles)
Ten Thousand, Eight Hundred and Twenty Endangered Species in the Animal Kingdom (Big Countdown)
Life Cycle of a Tree (Life Cycles)

HASS

The Rabbits
Amazing Expeditions: Journeys That Changed The World
Avoid Being A Convict Sent To Australia! (The Danger Zone)
Barney and the Secret of the Whales (The Secret History Series)
Beth: The Story of a Child Convict
Birrung the Secret Friend (The Secret History Series)
Fortuyn’s Ghost
The Mayflower
Our Australian Girl: Meet Grace (Book 1)
Our Australian Girl: A Friend For Grace (Book 2)
Our Australian Girl: A Home For Grace (Book 4)
Our Australian Girl: Grace And Glory (Book 3)
I Wish I’d Sailed with Captain Cook
Meet… Captain Cook
Little Wooden Horse
The Mostly True Story Of Matthew & Trim
My Name is Lizzie Flynn: A Story of the Rajah Quilt
The Paddock (Walker Classic)
A Penny to Remember (Making Tracks S.)
The Unlikely Story of Bennelong and Phillip
What Was The War Like, Grandma? (Walker Classic)
What’s Your Story?

Health

Gary Asks for Help by Nyasha M. Chikoware
The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper
The Way I Feel by Janan Cain
The Koala Who Could by Rachel Bright
A Handful of Buttons by Carmen Parets Luque
A Family is a Family is a Family by Sara O’Leary
Hey Little Ant by Phillip and Hannah Hoose
The Colors of Us by Karen Katz
A Rainbow of Friends by P.K.Hallinan
All Are Welcome by Alexandra Penfold

Let me know if you have any other suggestions to add to this list by commenting below. I’d love to hear from you!!

Happy teaching!

Early Childhood Counting Rhymes

Early Childhood Counting Rhymes

Children learn best through rhyme and repetition. When I taught in Early Years classrooms, this mode of learning was well received by the children and engaged them in many learning opportunities, without formalising the learning they were engaging with. The following rhymes I am sharing with you today, are great for transitions and time fillers. Using fingers and actions, children will be engaged as they learn early number concepts as practising some fine motor movements to strengthen up those little fingers for writing.

Five Cookies (Action poem)
Five little cookies in the bakery shop.
Shining bright with the sugar on top.
Along comes (child’s name) with a nickel to pay.
He/she buys a cookie and takes it away.
(continue with four, three, two and one).

Five Fat Peas (A counting finger play especially useful in the Spring and Summer)
Five fat peas in a pea pod pressed (children hold hand in a fist)
One grew, two grew, so did all the rest (put thumb and fingers up one by one)
They grew and grew (raise hand int he air very slowly)
And did not stop,
Until one day
The pod went POP! (children clap hands together)

Birds (Poem)
There was one little bird in a little tree,
He was all alone, and he didn’t want to be.
So he flew far away, over the sea,
And brought back a friend to live in the tree.
(Substitute two, three, etc. for one as you finish the verse)

Turtles (Poem)
One baby turtle alone and new.
Finds a friend, and then there are two.
Two baby turtles crawl down to the sea.
They find another, and then there are three.
Three baby turtles crawl along the shore.
They find another, and then there are four.
Four baby turtles go for a dive.
Up swims another, and then there are five.

Five Little Bees
One little bee blew and flew,
He met a friend and that made two.
Two little bees, busy as could be,
Along came another and that made three.
Three little bees, wanted one more,
Found one soon and that made four.
Four little bees, going to the hive,
Spied their little brother, and that made five.
Five little bees working every hour,
Buzz away, bees, and find another flower.

Counting Apples (A finger play)
Five red apples
Hanging on a tree (five fingers help up)
The juiciest apples you ever did see!
The wind came past
And gave an angry frown (shake head and look angry)
And one little apple came tumbling down.
Four red apples, etc.

Monkeys In A Tree (Action poem)
Five little monkeys (five fingers held up)
Sitting in a tree
Teasing Mr. Crocodile,
“You can’t catch me.”
“You can’t catch me.”
Along comes Mr. Crocodile
As quiet as can be…
SNAP!! (clap hands together like a crocodile)
(Continue until all monkeys are gone then add at the end…)
Away swims Mr. Crocodile
As full as he can be!!!!

Five Little Firefighters (A finger play)
Five little fire fighters sit very still (hold up five fingers)
Until they see a five on top of the hill
Number one rings the bell, ding-dong (bend down thumb)
Number 2 pulls his big boots on (bend down pointer finger)
Number 3 climbs on the truck right away (bend down middle finger)
Number 4 joins him, no one can wait (bend down ring finger)
Number 5 drives the truck to the fire (bend down little finger)
The big yellow flames go higher and higher (spread arms)
Whoo-oo! Whooo-ooo! Hear the fire truck say (imitate siren)
As all of the cars get out of the way.
Shhhh! Goes the water from the fire hose spout, (rub palms together)
And quicker than a wink the fire is out! (clap hands)

Ten Little Firemen (Preschool children perform the actions that the words suggest)
Ten little firemen sleeping in a row, (extend both hand, fingers curled)
Ding dong goes the bell (pull bell cord with one hand)
And down the pole they go (close both fists, put one on top of the other, slide down pole)
Off on the engine, oh, oh, oh. (steer engine with hands)
Using the big hose, so, so, so.
When all the fire’s out, home sooo slow (steer engine with hands)
Back to bed, all in a row (extend both hands with fingers curled)

Five Good Friends
Five good friends – outside having fun
Until a mother called for one
To come and clean the floor
Five minus one, that leaves four.
Four good friends – outside having fun
Until a mother called for one
To come and have some tea.
four minus one, that leaves three.
Three good friends – outside having fun
Until a mother called for one
To come and find her shoe.
Three minus one, that leaves two.
Two good friends – outside having fun
Until a mother called for one
To come home, ’til his chores were done.
Two minus one, that leaves one.
One good friend – outside all alone
She stopped playing and also went home.
Now no one is outside having fun.
Now the friends outside is zero or none!

Let me know if you have any of your own favourite rhymes by adding them in the comments box below! Happy teaching!!