How to Make an Angle Fan

How to Make an Angle Fan

Angle Fans – Measuring Angles Made Fun!

Angles is a fun Maths topic to teach – but let me show you a way to take those measuring angles lessons to the next lesson!

I first discovered Angle Fans when I was teaching Year 5. They have since become an activity that I include every year in my upper primary Maths classes to expore angle properties and to practise measuring angles informally. I am excited to share the idea with you so that you and your students can hopefully join in on the fun with me!

Curriculum links

But before I explain to you how to make them, let me explain what outcomes this little activity can be ticking off (or at the very least contributing to the learning of!):
Year 6 Maths
Identify the relationships between angles on a straight line, angles at a point and vertically opposite angles; use these to determine unknown angles, communicating reasoning (AC9M6M04)
Year 5 Maths
Estimate, construct and measure angles in degrees, using appropriate tools including a protractor, and relate these measures to angle names (AC9M5M04)
Year 4 Maths
estimate and compare angles using angle names including acute, obtuse, straight angle, reflex and revolution, and recognise their relationship to a right angle (AC9M4M04)

I probably wouldn’t try this activity with kiddos any younger than year 4. It is a little fiddly and may become a class management nightmare if you want them to complete it independently!

The Process

Step 1 Decorate and then cut out two squares of paper or choose two coloured squares of paper already to cut to size. *Decorate both sides so you see the decorations after folding.

Step 2 Concertina fold each square by folding over and under, over and under until you have two springs.

angle fan folding | ridgy didge resources | australia

Step 3 Fold your springs in half so the open ends meet and glue the halves together. Let them dry for a few minutes.

angle fan unfold | ridgy didge resources | australia

Step 4 Now you are going to glue each of the squares together to create a larger fan. Let them dry for a few minutes.

angle fan gluing | ridgy didge resources | australia

Step 5 Get two popsticks and have an adult help you to cut one curved end off. Put some glue on a popstick and stick it in the first fold of one side of your fan.

angle fan closed | ridgy didge resources | australia

Step 6 Do the same with the other popstick to the other side of the fan.

angle fan quarter open | ridgy didge resources | australia

Step 7 Now you can pull out the fan by the popsticks to make some angles! Pull it gently right around to form a circle!

angle fan full open | ridgy didge resources | australia

So what do you reckon? Will you try this activity next time you are teaching angles to your upper primary students?

For more fun activities like this one, check out our Year 6 Angles Properties Maths unit:

Australian Curriculum Year 6 Maths Unit Angles | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Or our Year 5 Measuring Angles Maths Unit:

Australian Curriculum Year 5 Maths Unit Angles | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

I hope you found this helpful!

Angle Fan Craft | Ridgy didge resources | Australia

 

Measuring Angles – Geometric Animal Art

Measuring Angles – Geometric Animal Art

Measuring Angles Art Idea

I love integrating art and maths! It is an awesome way to bring a difficult or more boring Maths topic to life.

When you are teaching your students how to measure angles to your upper primary students, art is the most fun way to get your kiddos excited about the topic.

Today I thought I would share with you one of my most favourite Maths + Art ideas!! The result is truly amazing and it ticks HEAPS of teaching and learning goals at the same time.

Curriculum links

But before I share with you what the activity is, let me explain what outcomes this unit can be ticking off (or at the very least contributing to the learning of!):
Year 6 Maths
Identify the relationships between angles on a straight line, angles at a point and vertically opposite angles; use these to determine unknown angles, communicating reasoning (AC9M6M04)
Year 6 Visual Arts 
Use visual conventions, visual arts processes and materials to plan and create artworks that communicate ideas, perspectives and/or meaning (AC9AVA6C01).
Select and present documentation of visual arts practice, and display artworks in informal and/or formal settings (AC9AVA6O01).
Year 5 Maths
Estimate, construct and measure angles in degrees, using appropriate tools including a protractor, and relate these measures to angle names (AC9M5M04)
Year 5 Visual Arts 
Use visual conventions, visual arts processes and materials to plan and create artworks that communicate ideas, perspectives and/or meaning (AC9AVA6C01).
Select and present documentation of visual arts practice, and display artworks in informal and/or formal settings (AC9AVA6O01).
Year 4 Maths
estimate and compare angles using angle names including acute, obtuse, straight angle, reflex and revolution, and recognise their relationship to a right angle (AC9M4M04)
Year 4 Visual Arts
Experiment with a range of ways to use visual conventions, visual arts processes and materials (AC9AVA4D01).
Use visual conventions, visual arts processes and materials to create artworks that communicate ideas, perspectives and/or meaning (AC9AVA4C01).

I probably wouldn’t try this activity with kiddos any younger than year 4. I’m not sure they would completely be able to visualise and implement the skills required to complete the artwork. The exploration of angles below year 3 is a lot simpler too, so other activities may be of more assistance with their learning at this age level.

The Process

Step 1 Trace a straight-edged outline of your animal onto white paper. Use a window or light box to help you see the image clearly.

angle art animal outline | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Step 2 Place 3-5 dots within your image to become points of interest.

Step 3 Use a ruler and pencil to draw lines from the points of interests to the intersections and the outline of the body to create angles within your image.

angle art animal outline with lines | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Step 4 Go over your pencil lines with a fine liner and erase the pencil markings.

angle art animal outline with black lines | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Step 5 Have your students then colour in each section they have created inside their animal outline. You can also then have the cut out their animal and glue it next to the original image onto a black piece of card.

angle art animal outline with colour | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

angle art animal outline finished product | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Step 6 Have your students try to find all the different types of angles they have learnt about.

What do you reckon? Will you try this activity next time you are teaching angles to your upper primary students?

For more fun activities like this one, check out our Year 6 Angles Properties Maths unit:

Australian Curriculum Year 6 Maths Unit Angles | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

Or our Year 5 Measuring Angles Maths Unit:

Australian Curriculum Year 5 Maths Unit Angles | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

I hope you found this helpful!

Measuring Angles Art Idea | Ridgy Didge Resources | Australia

 

Using Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum

Using Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum

There is a key element that can unite all areas of the Australian Curriculum whether it be content areas, cross curriculum priorities or general capabilities. Let us explore this key – Picture Books.

Research has long shown the correlation between higher academic achievement and children who read daily for pleasure. However, the benefits of engaging regularly with quality literature extends well beyond academic achievement. It has also long been recognised that literature can be a powerful tool for developing children’s social and emotional well-being.

Literature can provide role models for children as well as a context for discussing morals and values. Children’s literature can also be used to extend children’s knowledge and understanding of themselves and those who may be different culturally, socially or historically.

With this examined briefly, we can begin to see how a well selected collection of children’s literature, coupled with sound practice, has the potential to provide a strong linking thread across the Australian Curriculum.

Encouraging Response

When working with picture books it is important to consider how the listeners or readers are responding to the text. It is important to let go of any notions of control to direct the responses and input of children. But rather let the discussion free flow so that children are given the opportunity to develop their oral language skills in a non-threatening environment.

Building a Picture Book Collection

Choosing age-appropriate material is vital to the success of language and literacy development in your students.

I have taken the hard work out of finding such books, by creating a list of book recommendations that are suitable for each Primary School grade listed in the Australian Curriculum. I have even linked each book to their most relevant curriculum areas although you will quickly see that many of the books address multiple curriculum requirements.

You can find these lists here:
Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum: Foundation Year
Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum: Year 1
Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum: Year 2
Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum: Year 3
Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum: Year 4
Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum: Year 5
Picture Books to Support the Australian Curriculum: Year 6

Well selected and used picture books can be powerful tools for educators. The magic of literature includes elements such as: helping children view others as equal members of society, promoting a more positive sense of self, helping children learn about the world, helping to cope with stress, providing insights into problems, and the list could go on.

When these elements are viewed in line with the Australian Curriculum it is clear to see that well selected and carefully used children’s picture books can and should be a vital key used by educators to unlock the Australian Curriculum, making the content more manageable for teachers and students alike.

Do you use picture books in the classroom? If so, I’d love to know some of your favourites for the grade you teach! Feel free to tell me by leaving a comment below.

Happy Teaching!!

Fishpond

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